Tom Curran | Marion Real Estate, Mansfield Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, Middleboro Real Estate


Want to add your house to the real estate market? Work with an expert real estate agent, and you can streamline the home selling process.

A real estate agent can make a world of difference for any home seller, at any time. This housing market professional will teach you the ins and outs of selling a home and ensure you can get the best price for your residence. Plus, he or she will be ready to respond to your home selling questions and provide consistent support as the home selling journey progresses.

Ultimately, it is important to understand what it takes to work with a real estate agent. This will allow you to maintain a positive approach throughout the home selling process. It might help you improve your chances of a quick sale too.

What does it take to work with a real estate agent? Here are three rules that every home seller should consider.

1. Hire a Real Estate Agent That Makes You Feel Comfortable

Selling a home can be stressful, particularly for a first-time property seller. Fortunately, working with the right real estate agent ensures you can receive world-class home selling guidance.

As a home seller, you should employ a real estate agent that makes you feel comfortable. This housing market professional will be able to alleviate your home selling concerns and guarantee you are fully supported at each stage of the home selling journey.

2. Keep the Lines of Communication Open at All Times

What good is a real estate agent if he or she won't keep you up to date about home showings, offers on your residence and homebuyer feedback?

For a home seller, it is paramount to collaborate with a real estate agent who can provide immediate assistance. This housing market professional should be ready to communicate with you via phone, email and text and provide regular updates throughout the home selling cycle.

Your real estate agent also should be unafraid to be honest with you. That way, you can receive unbiased suggestions and recommendations from your real estate agent that can help you make informed home selling decisions.

3. Understand That Problems May Arise During Home Selling Process

Although a real estate agent will do everything possible to promote your house to the right groups of property buyers, it is vital to remember that the real estate market offers no guarantees. In addition, problems sometimes may arise that may slow down the home selling journey.

Your real estate agent should be able to describe challenges that you may encounter before you add your residence to the housing market. This will enable you to plan ahead and allocate the necessary time and resources to reduce the risk of such problems.

Hiring a real estate agent to help you sell your house may seem difficult at first. But with the aforementioned tips, you can find an expert real estate professional who will make it easy for you to sell your residence.


Image by Andrey Popov from Shutterstock

The term "fair market value" is the price at which an interested but not desperate buyer is willing to buy and a motivated but not distressed seller is willing to sell on the open market in your location. The set value depends on recently sold similar-sized homes with like amenities, upgrades, and location. These are known as "comparables" or "comps" in real estate jargon.

Your best resource for learning the market value of your home is your trusted real estate professional. They have access to lists of homes like yours that sold on the open market in recent weeks and months. Of course, no one can know if your home will sell since other factors might be at work too. Changes in local industry and the job market might cause prices to move either down or up. Weather can factor in also.

What if prices drop?

Should you enter the market just as prices begin trending down, you might choose to set your price just below the fair market value. That way, you won’t be forced to lower your opening price if they keep trending downward. To stay competitive, increase the value, not the price. Professionals know ways to market your home’s exceptions such as recent upgrades, repairs, a new roof, walkability, proximity to social life and other seemingly intangible items that keep your home at the top of people’s list.

What if prices go up?

Neither you nor your agent can accurately anticipate the market. But if prices seem to be going up, set yours near the top of the “fair” values. Try not to overprice your home since doing so can have unintended consequences. Lenders and underwriters operate slightly behind the market adjustments, so when you set a too high price, your buyers may not qualify for financing.

Setting the price

Your agent can help you set the right price the first time. Trust their knowledge and expertise in the marketplace. If you’re not sure about the price, test the waters by asking your agent to keep your home as a pocket listing. That is, a listing they can tell agents and clients about that doesn’t appear on the multiple listing services (MLS). That way, you can see if your pricing strategy gains any traction.



 Photo by Prawny via Pixabay

Circa 1965, having beautiful wood paneling was the envy of the neighborhood. It was like bringing the outdoors in. But 50-60 years later, it usually just makes a room seem dark and dated unless you live in a log cabin. In most cases, you can remove the paneling and paint the drywall underneath. Here's what you'll do.

What you'll need

  • Primer
  • Brushes
  • Paint rollers 
  • Painter's tape
  • Plastic floor protection
  • Paint pan
  • Putty knife
  • Spackling paste for nail holes
  • Safety goggles
  • Screwdriver
  • Flashlight
  • Pry bar
  • Hand sander

Step one: make sure there's drywall under there

Some home builders simply hung the panels directly onto the studs. Others hung drywall first. Then they nailed the paneling over it. Before you begin this project, you need to know what you have. 

*Pro tip* Find out if you have drywall by removing the outlet and light switch covers. Then peer into the wall with your flashlight. You should be able to see the rough edges of drywall in there. If not, don't proceed unless you also want to hang the drywall. It's not that hard. But it's a two-person, multiple weekend job for the average DIYer. We want you to know what you're getting into. If this is more than you feel comfortable with, contact a professional.

Step two: remove the paneling

Put on your safety goggles. Insulation, nails or a piece of wood could go flying during this job.

Next, use a pry bar to remove any molding or trim, carefully if you plan to reuse it. Now, you'll see the edges of the panel. Pry it off panel by panel. It will be nailed into the studs, so you'll need to put some upper body strength into it. Break boards to get it off the wall. But try to keep the drywall underneath as undamaged as possible.

Step three: repair the drywall

You'll definitely have nail holes to fill after removing the paneling. You may also have small gouges. They are easy to fix. And you'll need to do that to have a smooth painting surface.

Apply spackle to the holes with your putty knife. Then allow them to dry before sanding the surface smooth. You may need a second coat. But know it doesn't have to be perfect. That's what primer is for.

Step four: prime the wall

Primer helps fill small imperfections and smooth the painting surface in preparation for painting the wall. Lay down your plastic and apply painter's tape where needed. Then roll your wall with primer. Use the paintbrush to get corners and crevices that a roller won't reach. 

*Pro tip* If you take a break, put the end of your roller and paintbrush in a large freezer bag and seal it as well with tape or a rubber band. If the primer or paint dries on the brush, you may have to replace it. That's an extra expense you can avoid.

Let the primer dry on the wall. Then use your flashlight to see if there are any thin spots. Apply more, as needed.

And you're all ready to choose your paint color. Goodbye, paneling. Hello, 21st Century. For more home projects to update and improve your home, follow our blog.


Image by Muntzir Mehdi from Pixabay

A seller's market poses a challenge for any buyer - when there are more buyers competing for homes than there are homes in market, you have to be ready to move swiftly when you find a home you like. Since the inventory of luxury homes is usually small when compared with more conventional homes on the market, a seller's market could make it more difficult to get the home you want, even if your financial details are in order and you're ready to buy. 

What is a Seller's Market? 

A seller's market simply means that there are more people who want to buy a home than there are homes for sale. When this happens, homes can move very swiftly -- some will sell within days of listing -- and buyers need to be able to offer appealing contracts to secure a home. While the luxury market often contains a smaller inventory, there are also fewer buyers competing for homes, but the market can still favor sellers. 

Tips for Buying a Luxury Home in a Seller's Market

Visit in Person: Your real estate agent can help narrow down the possibilities and you can even send someone ahead to take a first look for you -- but you should view the home sooner rather than later if you want to see it in person before you buy. Luxury homes in high end vacation destinations can go very quickly in a sellers market, so you may not have the amount of time you are used to for viewing the property. 

Streamline the Process: Work with your luxury real estate agent to prepare a compelling offer that is free of contingencies, or as free as it can be. The fewer conditions you have and the easier you are to deal with, the more likely it is the seller will accept your offer. Offer a swift and easy closing, request no contingencies and be ready to go swiftly when you find the home you want.  

Have Financing in Place: If you need a mortgage, you should have your details worked out and ready to go. A seller with an advantage will be reviewing multiple offers and yours should indicate there will be no delays in closing. If you are a cash buyer, the funds should be available in time for closing; make preparations early and assume you will need to close within a month. 

Be Prepared to Pay Full Price: The most common impact of a seller's market is that homes sell for the asking price -- or even more than the list price. Your agent can help you determine if a full price offer is right, or if you should even consider offering above the selling price. This is most likely in a hot market where homes are selling as soon as they list. If the home is still available after a week on the market, a full price offer may not be needed, if everything else is in order. 

Make the most of the process by working with a skilled agent who is familiar with the complexities and demands of the luxury market. They will be more adept at helping you find and secure the property you want than a conventional agent. When you do find a home you like, be ready to act quickly so it does not get away; these steps will help ensure you don't miss out on a property you love. 


Image by Mario Ohibsky from Pixabay

Whether you’re getting your home ready to sell or just getting settled into a new one, making sure your roof is in excellent condition is important. Your roof helps keep the inside of your home safe from water and other types of damage. Roofs can endure wear and tear over time or end up with damage from storms, but routine maintenance helps reduce these risks. Getting professional roof maintenance done once or twice a year provides the following benefits for your home. 

Lower Risk of Major Repairs

When you have your roof maintained, you’ll have a lower risk of needing repairs. Roof maintenance involves checking different parts of your roof for minor damage or potential issues that could lead to damage over time. You can then have these smaller problems taken care of as they arise. Doing this helps reduce your risk of ending up with serious roof damage that requires costly and complicated repairs. Keep in mind that many signs of roof damage or issues aren’t easy for homeowners to spot. Having your roof inspected and maintained regularly helps ensure that these problems are found early. 

Longer Lifespan for Your Roof

Although your roof should last for many years, it could have a shorter lifespan due to excessive wear and tear or damage that goes unnoticed and isn’t fixed. Since the cost of a roof replacement is among the bigger expenses for homes, you should try to help yours last as long as possible. Routine roof maintenance helps reduce the effects of wear and tear on your roof and ensures that minor or more serious damage is found and fixed promptly. With this type of regular maintenance, your roof should reach its lifespan instead of needing to be replaced early. 

Reduced Risk of Health Problems

Roofs can develop leaks that result in mold growth over time. When these leaks go undetected, they can cause serious water damage and mold growth inside your ceilings, walls and other areas of your home. Mold can cause respiratory health problems and other kinds of health issues for some people, especially those with asthma or allergies. During routine roof maintenance visits, your roofing technician can look for signs of minor or major leaks and take steps to repair them as quickly as possible to reduce the risk of mold growth and water damage. 

Improved Energy Efficiency

Problems with your roof, such as a missing shingle or two, can affect your energy efficiency. Your home can lose heated air through your attic and roof during winter, causing your furnace to run more. In summer, hot air from outside can make your home harder to cool. Routine roof maintenance can help prevent higher heating and cooling bills and increased energy usage.




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